Tag Archives: social media

Which GF Blogs Should I Follow?

7 Jun

Deciding to follow a gluten free blog is much easier said than done. The vast amount of diverse information on the web makes finding a blog that fits your needs and interests somewhat tricky. As many of my readers may recall, one of my New Year’s Resolutions (NYR) for 2012 was to start following some GF blogs.

Though very active in the GF blogosphere as a writer, my second NYR aimed to increase my activity as a reader. I have started following a couple GF blogs and have discovered that not only are there many GF blogs out there but they are all very different. If you started following one or two blogs and simply felt it was not meant for you, I encourage you try one more time!

What to look for?

1. Content — are you interested in cooking? music? traveling? education? No matter what your interest, you can probably find a blog out there that is a great mash up for your interest in ________ and the gluten free diet. My interests are mostly focused around the social aspects of the gluten free diet, food policy and restaurant guides for cities. With a little bit of digging, I found blogs that matched those interests fairly easily. Are you interested in traveling? Though not one of my interests, I know there are a ton of avid GF travelers out there who would appreciate a blog that updates about being gluten free while traveling. If this is you, click here for posts by Erin Smith.

2. Frequency — check out how frequently the blogger posts. If you like frequent posts in your email inbox then the blog is a great match. If you are quasi spam-conservative (like myself) you may want to find a blog that posts less frequently e.g. ~once every 3 weeks like CC Gluten Freed!

3. Visuals — reading on your laptop, phone or tablet can be hard on your eyes. Try to find a blog that is pleasant to look at and easy to read. When I created CC Gluten Freed, I chose an off-white/cream for the background of the site so that overwhelming brightness would not discourage readers. You may also want to check out the mobile phone format of the blog before committing if you do most of your reading on the go.

4. Writing Style — bloggers write in various styles. For example, some may write in the third person while others may have a more personal/testimonial blog written in the first person. Some may post updates using journalistic techniques you would encounter when reading the LA Times while others may write more colloquially (like CC Gluten Freed!).

What are my preferences?

I try to make CC Gluten Freed representative of what I want to see in other GF blogs. This many be painfully obvious but I write about what interests me about being gluten free. If you enjoy reading about the social aspects of the gluten free diet then I encourage you follow my blog. I update, on average, every 3 weeks and have very diverse topics ranging from holiday survival guides, going to the spa, moving to a new city, commenting on new developments in the GF world and much more.

The blogs I follow:

1. Accidental Celiac – I love this blog. The frequency of posting is perfect. Posting too frequently can make followers feel like they are being spammed but the Accidental Celiac posts at a great frequency. I am always happy to see a new email from her in my inbox. If anything, I wish she would post more! The Accidental Celiac is a blog that emphasizes the realities of being gluten free. In her first post she writes “If you have Celiac and it has been a complete dream for you, then this blog probably isn’t for you.”

Check out her post about the new pizza at Chuck E. Cheese. This is the kind of blogging that I am talking about when I say I care about the social aspects of being gluten free. She admits that the pizza offered at Chuck E Cheese is, let’s just say, far from gourmet. The great thing about the pizza isn’t its taste but what it did for her kid: it let her daughter have a great time at Chuck E Cheese with all the other kids!

2. Adventures of a Gluten Free Mom - Although the name makes it seem like this blog only applies to people with kids: this couldn’t be farther from the truth. I find this blog very interesting and helpful. The blog “represents what all of us following the gluten-free LIFESTYLE are seeking: a place to find answers to some of the deeper questions.” The blog has a mix of posts about living gluten free as well as cooking gluten free.

3. Gluten Dude - This blog is candid, funny and informative. In particular, I love his post “13 reasons to be thankful you have Celiac Disease.” He also does some pretty interesting bits on his blog. For example, in honor of Celiac Awareness month and “to help raise awareness of our disease, [Gluten Dude] will be attempting 31 blog posts in 31 days.”

4. Gluten Free Mom – It is crazy to me that I love all the GF mom blogs so much considering the fact that I am not a mom. Nonetheless, these blogs are great! I find that moms seems to understand the fact that Celiac Disease and the gluten free diet has some serious effects on your social life. In addition, the moms are such great advocates. It is very hard to advocate for yourself but when it is your kid, I believe it becomes natural to advocate for their needs. Gluten Free Mom has fantastic restaurant guides for a bunch of different cities. I exclusively used her suggestions for where to dine in NYC and had a great experience.

5. NFCA — Though not a blog, I find that the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness has the best monthly newsletter and website in terms of content and accessibility. The content is applicable to anyone on the gluten free diet, not simply people with Celiacs. NFCA goes out of its way to capture audiences of every generation/age group. Your, your kids, your grandparents and friends can all find interesting things to read that are geared towards their age group. Sign up for their monthly newsletter! Here is an article that I wrote for the NFCA newsletter about how to make a difference in local communities.

In addition to follow these blogs, I also follow all of these bloggers on twitter which is very fun and interactive!

Being engaged in the gluten free blogosphere is incredibly useful for leading a healthy, gluten free life. The constant updates about news in the GF community keeps you up to date with the most current information, the ability to comment on posts or use twitter gives you the chance to interact with people in the GF community and, finally, the blogs are a great source for information about being gluten free.

Get involved today!

If you haven’t already, I encourage you to follow CC Gluten Freed! You can sign up easily by typing your email address into the box on the right-hand side of the screen.

Follow me on Twitter

Like me on Facebook

Check out the other GF bloggers I recommended on Twitter and Facebook.

For Travel: https://twitter.com/#!/gfglobetrotter

For Fun: https://twitter.com/#!/GlutenDude

For Great Information: https://twitter.com/#!/CeliacCentral

For Moms and Dads: https://twitter.com/#!/adventuresgfmom

-CC

How To Get The Most Out Of Your GF or Celiac Support Group

22 Apr

No time to read? Click here to listen to this blog post!


You may have heard of them,  you may have even been to them but are you making the most out of them?  Gluten free support groups can be very useful and a great addition to your gluten free lifestyle.  The trick is knowing how to make the most of them.  Support group meetings can vary in terms of structure and content.  All of the group meetings I have been to have consisted of an informative guest speaker, usually a leader in the GF community, informal mingling with other attendees and samples from a GF food vendor.

Are there certain things you should keep in mind in order to maximize the benefits of  attending?  Absolutely!

Here are my suggestions that I hope you adopt before attending your next, or first, GF support group meeting.

1. Bring business cards – one of the biggest emotional challenges of having Celiac Disease or gluten intolerance is the inevitable, yet probably only occasional, sense of being alone.  Finding a gluten free support group will show you that you are not alone.  Seeing it is not enough though, you need to feel it.  To do this, make some gluten free friends!  Bringing business cards to meetings makes it very easy for you to exchange contact information with the other attendees.Typically, the mingling at meetings is very informal.  You are unlikely to have a table to write on or pens and paper for trading contact info.  In addition to lack of resources, you may not have the time to have the exchange of contact information in the brief minutes allotted to mingling, especially if you have somewhere you need to be after the meeting.  Business cards are quick, to the point and a great way to help you remember someone!  If you don’t have business cards, get some personal contact cards made!  They are very inexpensive to order and super fun to design at www.vistaprint.com

2. Ask the right questions – at many GF support group meetings, group leaders schedule a guest speaker to come educate the group about various aspects of the gluten free diet.  At the Oakland Celiac Support Group I have heard from speakers such as Dr. Emily Nock, a primary care physician and Celiac Advocate at Kaiser Permanente, and Ann Whelan, the Editor-in-Chief of Gluten Free Living magazine. You want to capitalize on your opportunity to ask questions, especially considering how incredibly talented and qualified the sources at meetings tend to be.  But, what to ask?  Avoid overly personal medical questions.  Though the speaker may be a physician,they aren’t going to be able to give you solid medical advice based on one question in the middle of a group lecture.  In addition, asking personal medical questions takes away from the group’s ability to benefit from the speakers advice.  Ask more general questions that aren’t overly specific to your personal medical status.  For example, don’t ask a 3-4 minute long question that requires you reciting your medical history. Instead, ask questions like “what is the possibility of people finding a cure for Celiacs? What would a cure look like?” or “What is the current status on GF labeling laws and how do you think they will impact my health?”

3. Get to know at least one person really well each time – This goes along with the idea of bringing business cards to the meetings.  Try and establish a genuine connection with at least person at each meeting.  Of course, you won’t have time to get to know everyone which is why having business cards on hand is very helpful.  Try chatting with the person sitting next to you.  Try looking for someone who has a similar lifestyle of life context as you do. For example, if you are the mom of a Celiac kid then look for another Celiac parent to get to know.  If you are a very busy, fast paced business person look for someone who has a similar job or similar job demands.

4. Introduce yourself to the guest speaker -At the time when I heard Dr. Emily Nock speak at the Oakland Celiac Support Group, I was just beginning to consider the medical field as a potential career goal.  After her presentation, I introduced myself and asked her if I could shadow her medical practice.  Although I did not have a personal contact card, Dr. Nock took down my contact information.  I shadowed Dr. Nock for a full semester while at Cal and two years later, Dr. Nock is both my friend and my mentor.  Never miss an opportunity to network with people in the gluten see community, especially GF leaders.

5. Follow up – This is my biggest piece of advice.  Follow up with the people that you meet at these meetings. Shoot them an email or give them a call next Saturday morning.  Make sure that these connections don’t get lost in the hustle and bustle of  your life.  The friendships and connections you make at these meetings can really improve your gluten free lifestyle.  There are a ton of different ways you can follow up with people: Linked In, Twitter, Facbeook, email etc.  Choose whichever one is best for you!

If you don’t have a GF support group, I highly suggest finding one!  There are a ton of resources for you on the web.  Check out the Celiac Disease Foundation’s extensive list of GF support groups across the nation.  National Foundation for Celiac Awareness also has a database dedicated to this topic.  For more support group options try signing up for www.meetup.com.  This website is a social media site where people can form and search for groups based on their interests.  In addition to these resources you can always google your city and “gluten free support group” to find contact information for a group in your area.

Hope these tips make your next GF support group an invaluable and rewarding gluten free experience.
-CC
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