Tag Archives: writing

CC Gluten Freed in 2013

3 Jan

Happy New Year! I am looking forward to a new year full of gluten-free living but before we charge ahead let’s take a look at CC Gluten Freed in 2013!

2013 was a year full of excitement and big events. I was picked up as a writer for the Gluten Intolerance Group’s printed publication, Celebrate Gluten-Free, I attended a national coalition on the hill to promote the interests of the gluten-free community and I attended some very fun awareness events throughout the year!

My biggest accomplishment this year was being picked up by GIG to be a regular contributor to their printed publication, Celebrate Gluten-Free. The wonderful staff of GIG send me writing assignments on a variety of topics that test my creativity, critical thinking skills and gluten-free knowledge. You can subscribe here. Sometimes I write pieces offering advice, sometimes I write about a personal experience or struggle with living gluten-free, whatever the topic I have given each article my all.

To subscribe to GIG’s magazine just sign up for membership here: http://www.gluten.net/product-category/memberships/

The magazine is incredibly well done and has diverse articles that will benefit even the most veteran celiacs. The winter edition (coming out soon!) features two pieces that I wrote: a piece about gluten-free weddings and a piece on dating gluten-free, the two extreme ends of the relationship spectrum! The best part about the wedding article? I got to go wedding cake testing!

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In March I attended the Digestive Disease National Coalition, heading the Maryland advocates group  and talking to Maryland’s Senators and some Representatives about policies that, if passed, would benefit our community. For example, we advocated that the Senate should continue to declare May Celiac Awareness month! You can read about my trip to the Hill here.

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I spent a few weeks working with the Celiac Disease Foundation in Los Angeles, California during the summer. My task was to re-write the information about celiac disease on their website. CDF spent a few months putting together a dynamic, user-friendly design for their  website. You can check it out here! I was honored to write information that will benefit the celiac community! It was pretty fun taking a break from my normal, colloquial writing style and writing down just the facts about what celiac disease is. As I am entering medical school in the Fall, it was great practice speaking very technically about symptoms, treatment and the like.

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While working with the Celiac Disease Foundation, I was also trying out a new diet: the raw food diet. My family and I decided to go on, what we deemed, a “raw food detox.” We spent three weeks eating only raw foods! Although it was challenging, I actually felt great! The diet forced me to rely on mostly vegetables and nuts for food which left me feeling energized and light. It was an empowering experience choosing to limit my diet instead of having my diet limited by celiac disease. Though a fun experiment, warm food definitely hits the spot during this cold winter in Washington DC but maybe I will revisit the raw food diet again during the summer.

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What better way to wrap up the summer than a baseball game? In August, I made a trip up to Philadelphia to work with the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness at their annual Phillies Gluten Free Awareness night!

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I had a blast. Not only did I get to chow down on a real Philly cheesesteak sandwich but I also got to pull the raffle ticket winners! They had a great turn out! Members of the celiac and gluten-free community came out with signs demonstrating their gluten-free pride (and love for the home-team, the Phillies).

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Although the Phillies were playing my hometown team, the Dodgers, I wore my Phillies cap to support the team that supports the gluten-free community! It was great fun and great company! The highlight? Drinking a beer (gluten-free, of course!) at the game. What an iconic experience that many gluten-free people think may be out of reach but with the efforts of organizations like NFCA, more and more baseball stadiums have gluten-free beer and hotdogs! Sometimes, you just want to enjoy the little things in life!

The highlight of 2013 for CC Gluten Freed? Attending the Gluten Intolerance Group’s Health and Wellness event in Seattle, Washington. The event is a great opportunity for me to meet many of my readers and connect with new members of the gluten-free community. I also get  to spend time with some of my favorite gluten-free vendors like Brazi Bites (cheese bread from Brazil), the Flying Apron (bakery in Seattle), Udi’s and various gluten-free breweries that are popping up along the west coast.

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Just like last year, my dad came with me to help run my booth. I gave out CC Gluten Freed bracelets, brochures, pens and print-outs of some of my more popular posts like my Gluten-Free Tiramisu Cupcake Recipe, 5 Things To Do With Kind Bars and The Best of CC Gluten Freed 2012. 


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Happy New Year, everyone!

-CC

 

The Domino’s Effect

10 May

A Little Bit of History

Domino’s Pizza was founded in 1960 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Today, it is the second-largest pizza chain in the United States (second to Pizza Hut) and has more than 9,000 established franchised stores in the world. An incorporation with a successful foothold in 60 countries has a lot of power over the pizza industry’s reputation and the expectations of consumers with respect to the quality of service that a reputable pizza store should meet.

Domino’s has a history of being the first of its industry to adapt certain unique marketing techniques. For example, in 1973 Domino’s started advertising their 30-minute guarantee to customers. If Domino’s couldn’t deliver the pizza within 30 minutes of ordering, your pizza was free. In the 1980s the offer went from a free pizza to $3 off due to liability issues. Consumers began to speak out about the dangers of the 30-minute guarantee, expressing that it caused the delivery people to engage in unsafe driving. Eventually the 30-minute guarantee advertising campaign was dropped due to political and legal pressures.

What does this history have to do with the new gluten-free pizza crust?  Domino’s has a history of being pizza pioneers when it comes to advertising.  Ironically, the marketing campaigns employed by Domino’s seem to have a domino effect: once Domino’s does it, all of the other chains begin to follow suit.  If history is to repeat itself, I wouldn’t be surprised if more pizza chains not only start offering gluten-free crusts but also follow Domino’s lead with regard to how they offer this new product.

Domino’s Gluten Free Pizza

As most people in the GF and celiac community know, Domino’s started offering a gluten-free pizza crust on May 7, 2012.  Ironically announced during Celiac Awareness Month, the company explicitly stated that this gluten-free pizza is not designed for people with celiac disease.  The pizza crust, in a vacuum, is gluten-free.  What is the catch? Domino’s hasn’t taken any of the necessary precautions to prevent cross-contamination.  In fact, on their website they state “While the Gluten-Free Crust is certified to be free of gluten, the pizza made with the Gluten-Free Crust use the same ingredients and utensils as all of our other pizzas.”

Here is a video that Domino’s made to help get the word out about their new product.

Their advertisement for gluten-free crust starts off by saying “Because we are honest people, here is a disclaimer.”  For the record, a more accurate beginning to their disclaimer would state “Because we are lazy people, here is a disclaimer.” It would simply take a bit more education, training and effort to provide a fairly safe gluten-free option.  At the end of the video ad you hear the narrator saying “Ok, enough already with the disclaimers we are really excited to tell you about our new gluten-free crust…”  Not only is the crust not actually gluten-free but Domino’s goes so far as to dismiss their disclaimer as if it is an irrelevant formality

Issue #1: Gluten Free Labeling Laws

The FDA is close to formally establishing the legal requirements necessary to label a product as gluten free.  Despite being on the books as an issue needing regulation for several years, the FDA has failed to respond to public pressure until now. The FDA only regulates food products but I wonder why the government recognizes that products should be regulated for the gluten-free status but not restaurants that offer similar products.

Government entities like the USDA and FDA protect the US population by regulating highly distributed, manufactured and agricultural food products.  This is important to prevent public health catastrophes related to contaminated food products.

In general, it would not make sense to allocate government resources for regulating restaurants on a federal level because, in the past, if a restaurant had contaminated products or unsafe practices it wouldn’t affect enough people for it to be considered a federal issue. Unfortunately, in the world of chains and franchises, the idea that restaurants only impact their immediate surroundings is no longer true.

In this context we are talking about a pizza company that is located in every single state in this country with over 5,000 individual restaurant locations.  The kitchen ingredients used by Domino’s can affect a large part of the US population and, more relevantly, their institutionalized kitchen protocol can affect people on a population level as well.

If Domino’s wants to offer a gluten free crust they should be subject to some form of regulation since their product is so wide-reaching.  If Domino’s had a kitchen protocol that had all their chains set the ovens to a temperature that consistently undercooked meat, resulting in food poisoning, we would have a national health crisis on our hands.  I don’t know why we are turning a blind eye when it comes to gluten free protocol in the kitchen.

Furthermore, calling their pizza “gluten free” should be considered false advertisement, if not fraud. Their appeal to the gluten free market is abhorrent.  The gluten-free market base is depression-proof and has been consistently and substantially growing for the past 10 years.  You should not be able to con your way into this market. If you take a chicken breast and dredge it lightly in flour before frying it, is this entree gluten free? NO. Is the chicken breast itself gluten free? YES. Similarly, if you have a gluten free pizza crust it is no longer gluten free if you cross-contaminate by preparing it in an environment covered in gluten-based flour (similar to a light dredging, if you will).

Issue #2 Corporate Precent

One of the main reasons that I find Domino’s actions completely unacceptable is because of, what I am calling, corporate precedent.  California Pizza Kitchen started offering a gluten free pizza crust before doing their homework.  They developed a crust but did not research cross-contamination protocol.  As a result, customers complained.  Did CPK slap a disclaimer on their menu and call it a day? No.  CPK pulled the pizza from their menu and started working with the Gluten Intolerance Group to develop a strategy to make their kitchen safe for gluten-free pizza cooking.  Domino’s justifies their lack of concern for cross-contamination by saying that the crust is for gluten intolerant or gluten sensitive consumers. Interestingly, although Domino’s argued that they are catering towards the gluten sensitive population, the Gluten Intolerance Group is the organization that stepped up to help CPK prevent cross contamination.  I really enjoyed this post by Linda who points out that, of all the gluten sensitive people she knows, none of them have “mild” senstiives” and they do not appreciate a contaminated pizza!

                                  

Domino’s has stated that they simply don’t have the kitchen capacity to make a truly gluten free pizza.  It seems reasonable that it might be hard to make a profit if they had to change their kitchen set up for this product.  Then I remember PF Changs, a nationally represented corporate restaurant chain that has successfully created a gluten free menu and has changed their kitchen set up to accommodate safe food preparation.

Before Domino’s the precedents set by various corporations trying to go gluten free have been in favor of trying to prevent cross-contamination. I fear for the gluten free future of the restaurant industry now that such a large and financially successful  company has started saying that it is ok to take the easy way out.

The Bigger Picture

Supply and demand: a fundamental concept in economics.  If consumers demand a certain product, the market will supply it. What happens when the supply and demand get muddled and confused?  Poor products. In response to perceived consumer demands restaurants and food companies are responding by creating “gluten-free” products.  The problem is that the market is not understanding the true nature of the current demand.

Supply is not the issue right now.  There are so many gluten free products on the market.  If current product supply were the issue I would pick up some frozen pizza crusts at Whole Foods, go to Domino’s and ask them to heat it up for me.  What is in need, the demand, is education and awareness.  I don’t need Domino’s to create and produce a tasty recipe for a pizza crust. Udi’s, among other companies, has awesome pizza crust already. What we need is a safe place to dine out 

Empowerment

I want to remind my readers that CPK stopped offering their gluten free pizza until they could establish a safe kitchen environment in response to a letter by a customer.  If you want Domino’s to take accountability then send them a letter (or write them an email) explaining why taking the gluten-free pizza one step further could make a huge difference in your life and in the lives of many other people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.

Here is their mailing address:

Domino’s Pizza LLC
30 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48106
(734) 930-3030

 

Check out my posts on the importance of writing letters and letter writing tips for advice.

Ultimately, if we want to change the market then we need to change the nature and clarity of our “demand.” The first step to this change? Advocate for yourself.
A note about NFCA

Check out their letter from Alice Bast discussing their involvement with Domino’s Pizza.  NFCA has taken a lot of heat for seemingly endorsing Domino’s.  Domino’s reached out to NFCA to consult about their new gluten free product.  NFCA informed Domino’s that the pizza is not safe for Celiacs and reviewed their ingredient lists and kitchen practices to draw this conclusion.  Although the Amber designation is fairly controversial, it is better than Domino’s advertising their pizza as gluten free without a disclaimer.  Check out this post by Linda from theglutenfreehomemaker.com  about why the amber designation may be a huge step back for the Celiac Community. Without NFCA Domino’s might have simply not let consumers know about the serious cross contamination risks.

-CC
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