Tag Archives: national foundation for celiac awareness

Gluten-Free Valentine’s Day

11 Feb

Whether it is your first Valentine’s Day living gluten-free or your millionth attempt at keeping things GF on our Hallmark Holiday of love you can always find new, safe and sexy ways to have a great gluten-free February 14th.


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Here are my favorite romantic (and gluten-free) ideas for the 14th! You will definitely enjoy these whether you are looking to share them with your beau or simply want to eat some yummy desserts Friday night!

French Macarons: There is something about a French macaron that just seems romantic. Maybe it is the extensive spectrum of colors they come in, the eccentric flavors or their delicate texture; whatever the reason they are a great option for Valentine’s day. French macarons are traditionally made with almond flour and thus are gluten-free.

I’ve never made French macaroons but they are on my baking bucket list. Here is a recipe for French macarons (I haven’t tested this recipe myself just yet  but here it is  in case you are curious how they are made.)

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Don’t feel like breaking out the mixing bowl? Search around for a bakery that has macarons! There are many bakeries and restaurants  like Olivia Macaron in Georgetown that sell macarons. Wherever you decide to pick up your macarons, check with the bakery to make sure their recipes are GF. Don’t forget to ask about the risk of cross-contamination! Macarons are not only beautiful, they are delicious and come in so many flavors that making a theme for Valentine’s day will be a cinch.

Flourless Chocolate Cake: believe it or not, flourless chocolate cake is actually a pretty classic dessert even outside the gluten-free community! Flourless chocolate cake is very, very rich. This is  kind of dish  is perfect for sharing because you can’t “chow down” on such a rich dessert; it is more of a nibbling culinary experience. Regardless, it is so delicious I cannot guarantee that you won’t fight over who gets the last bite. Here is the Food Network’s recipe for Flourless Chocolate Cake. Want to make yours special? Add a pinch of cayenne pepper for an extra kick.

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Candy: Don’t feel like cooking or questing for bakeries? Go for classic Valentine’s Day candies! When I first went gluten-free I didn’t realize that many of my traditions would no longer be an option for me (eg Italian Christmas Eve!).

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Luckily, one of my favorite Valentine’s Day traditions is safely marked gluten-free: Sweethearts by Necco. I don’t know what it is about these cute little candies but for whatever reason, I look forward to them every single year! The texture is chewy yet crunchy, sweet yet a bit sedate and those little messages…so fun!

Many other gluten-free candies make V-day versions of themselves: m&m’s, Nerds, Dove Chocolate and the like!

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Gluten-free Valentine’s Day Challenges?

Not surprisingly, there are some uniquely challenging situations that potentially  arise on V-day due to being gluten-free.

1. Choices/Planning — if your significant other has opted to take the reins for V-day planning you may feel a bit anxious about whether or not they will get the gluten-free thing right.  For some, their better-halves have mastered the art of all things gluten-free. To the Non-GFBFs and Non-GFGFs (non-gluten-free boyfriend/girlfriend…shout out to Erica Dermer!) out there, knowing all things gluten is a pretty sexy quality in a beau.

If your special someone doesn’t fully get the gluten-free thing just yet then  explain you’d be more comfortable planning Valentine’s Day. You should have the whole “I’m not sure if you planning Valetnine’s Day is such a good idea” talk sooner rather than later so get a move on!

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If you want your special someone to plan the big day then consider offering them a list of guidelines/tips for planning a gluten-free date. Obviously, you don’t want to kill the romance with logistics but the details are important so just be light hearted, patient and funny about it. Have them download “Find Me Gluten Free” on their phones and use that to pick the restaurant.

If he/she wants to cook for you, remind them about cross-contamination (clean the stove, don’t use a shared toaster etc.)  and ask them about the ingredients (they can tell you the ingredients without totally spoiling what the dish will be!)

PS this is not a hint for my valentine: I know you got the gf thing on lock 😉

2. Prix Fixe Menus – You may want to go to a hot new restaurant downtown on Valentine’s day but may encounter prix fixe menus at a lot of nicer places. You may not be aware that a restaurant is doing a special menu on V-day so call ahead and check if they have a set menu or if the regular menu is open to customers.  A lot of restaurants will make changes to the pre-fixed menu to accommodate a gluten-free customer but you should call ahead to confirm they can make the changes.

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3. Dessert — A lot of restaurants will not have a GF option for dessert so maybe plan on having dessert at home using one of the ideas listed above or call ahead and check about gluten-free dessert options!

Happy Valentine’s Day!

-CC

CC Gluten Freed’s Best of 2012

5 Jan

As the nation reviews the employment, or rather unemployment, data from December 2012, I too feel inclined to take a look at some numbers. CC Gluten Freed had a fantastic year when quantified in terms of hits and viewer traffic! Now, asking a blogger for the number of hits per year/day/whatever is similar to asking a woman her age: it is simply impolite. I will happily reveal some of my aggregate data and post CC Gluten Freed’s top hits of 2012! Just as NPR reviews the best podcasts, I will be reviewing my top posts of this year for you to share with friends or just enjoy for a second read through.

Best-of-2012

#1 Post of 2012

So you want to take a cooking class…

This post offers advice for taking mainstream cooking classes while being gluten free.  The cooking classes advertised as “gluten free” are usually special courses offered sporadically at cooking schools, local markets and local stores.  Gluten free people need to be able to cook for themselves since restaurants always pose a risk and bringing a dish to dinner parties is always a must.  How are we supposed to become master cooks when the only classes we attend teach gluten free baking and/or are hyper-specific classes eg a specific type of cuisine.

I wanted to take a cooking series that covered all the basics of cooking: knife skills, sauces, meats and poultry, baking, grains etc. Check out the top post of 2012 to find out how I managed to make my experience a gluten free on. 

#2 Post of 2012

The Domino’s Effect

Remember when Domino’s thought they were being gluten free? This post looks at the situation critically and examines both sides of the issue: was Domino’s position on gluten free pizza a valid one? Spoiler alert! I conclude that it was an absolutely abhorrent decision on Domino’s part.

In this post I applaud the NFCA for making sure that Domino’s did not falsely advertise their pizza. GREAT Kitchens was able to evaluate the kitchen practices that Domino’s intended to implement and concluded that their kitchen practices are not safe for Celiacs.

In addition, I point out the negative implications of such careless actions on Domino’s part.  Do the decisions of big companies have a domino effect?  Read to find out!

#3 Post of 2012

The Importance of Letters

The third favorite of 2012 is “The Importance of Letters.” I am glad that this post ranked so high in terms of traffic because this was one of my founding pieces for CC Gluten Freed.  The whole idea behind this blog is to spread awareness and teach my readers how to advocate for themselves and other people living with Celiac Disease.   This post discusses the what, when, where, why and how of writing letters to restaurants about gluten free customer experiences.

Check out how you can make a difference by spreading the word.

#4 Post of 2012

The Unsuspecting Celiac: Five Things That May Be Getting You

I am also glad that this post had so many views because it is a great resource for people who are gluten free but are still feeling symptomatic. In some cases, people let bits of gluten slip into their diet from some unexpected sources!  This post looks at five foods that a lot of gluten free people continue to eat even though they shouldn’t.

My favorite part of this post is the very end. I tell you five things you may be surprised to realize that you CAN eat!

#5 Post of 2012

Recipe: Quinoa with Cucumber and Mint – White Sea Bass with Orange-Tarragon Relish 

Coming in at #5 we have my recipe for cucumber mint quinoa!  This recipe is absolutely delicious!  It is a great dish to serve in the summer time because it is filling yet refreshing. I include little changes you can make to this recipe to keep things interesting. You can use this versatile recipe in so many contexts.

One tip: the Quinoa dish is perfect for bringing to a dinner party as a gift for the host.  It is filling enough so that if there isn’t anything you can eat your plate will still be full (as well as your stomach) but the dish is light enough that it won’t steal the show from whatever main entree your dinner host is serving.

Check out this post for the recipe!

 

 

Here’s to another year of great posts and many readers!

 

-CC

How To Get The Most Out Of Your GF or Celiac Support Group

22 Apr

No time to read? Click here to listen to this blog post!


You may have heard of them,  you may have even been to them but are you making the most out of them?  Gluten free support groups can be very useful and a great addition to your gluten free lifestyle.  The trick is knowing how to make the most of them.  Support group meetings can vary in terms of structure and content.  All of the group meetings I have been to have consisted of an informative guest speaker, usually a leader in the GF community, informal mingling with other attendees and samples from a GF food vendor.

Are there certain things you should keep in mind in order to maximize the benefits of  attending?  Absolutely!

Here are my suggestions that I hope you adopt before attending your next, or first, GF support group meeting.

1. Bring business cards – one of the biggest emotional challenges of having Celiac Disease or gluten intolerance is the inevitable, yet probably only occasional, sense of being alone.  Finding a gluten free support group will show you that you are not alone.  Seeing it is not enough though, you need to feel it.  To do this, make some gluten free friends!  Bringing business cards to meetings makes it very easy for you to exchange contact information with the other attendees.Typically, the mingling at meetings is very informal.  You are unlikely to have a table to write on or pens and paper for trading contact info.  In addition to lack of resources, you may not have the time to have the exchange of contact information in the brief minutes allotted to mingling, especially if you have somewhere you need to be after the meeting.  Business cards are quick, to the point and a great way to help you remember someone!  If you don’t have business cards, get some personal contact cards made!  They are very inexpensive to order and super fun to design at www.vistaprint.com

2. Ask the right questions – at many GF support group meetings, group leaders schedule a guest speaker to come educate the group about various aspects of the gluten free diet.  At the Oakland Celiac Support Group I have heard from speakers such as Dr. Emily Nock, a primary care physician and Celiac Advocate at Kaiser Permanente, and Ann Whelan, the Editor-in-Chief of Gluten Free Living magazine. You want to capitalize on your opportunity to ask questions, especially considering how incredibly talented and qualified the sources at meetings tend to be.  But, what to ask?  Avoid overly personal medical questions.  Though the speaker may be a physician,they aren’t going to be able to give you solid medical advice based on one question in the middle of a group lecture.  In addition, asking personal medical questions takes away from the group’s ability to benefit from the speakers advice.  Ask more general questions that aren’t overly specific to your personal medical status.  For example, don’t ask a 3-4 minute long question that requires you reciting your medical history. Instead, ask questions like “what is the possibility of people finding a cure for Celiacs? What would a cure look like?” or “What is the current status on GF labeling laws and how do you think they will impact my health?”

3. Get to know at least one person really well each time – This goes along with the idea of bringing business cards to the meetings.  Try and establish a genuine connection with at least person at each meeting.  Of course, you won’t have time to get to know everyone which is why having business cards on hand is very helpful.  Try chatting with the person sitting next to you.  Try looking for someone who has a similar lifestyle of life context as you do. For example, if you are the mom of a Celiac kid then look for another Celiac parent to get to know.  If you are a very busy, fast paced business person look for someone who has a similar job or similar job demands.

4. Introduce yourself to the guest speaker -At the time when I heard Dr. Emily Nock speak at the Oakland Celiac Support Group, I was just beginning to consider the medical field as a potential career goal.  After her presentation, I introduced myself and asked her if I could shadow her medical practice.  Although I did not have a personal contact card, Dr. Nock took down my contact information.  I shadowed Dr. Nock for a full semester while at Cal and two years later, Dr. Nock is both my friend and my mentor.  Never miss an opportunity to network with people in the gluten see community, especially GF leaders.

5. Follow up – This is my biggest piece of advice.  Follow up with the people that you meet at these meetings. Shoot them an email or give them a call next Saturday morning.  Make sure that these connections don’t get lost in the hustle and bustle of  your life.  The friendships and connections you make at these meetings can really improve your gluten free lifestyle.  There are a ton of different ways you can follow up with people: Linked In, Twitter, Facbeook, email etc.  Choose whichever one is best for you!

If you don’t have a GF support group, I highly suggest finding one!  There are a ton of resources for you on the web.  Check out the Celiac Disease Foundation’s extensive list of GF support groups across the nation.  National Foundation for Celiac Awareness also has a database dedicated to this topic.  For more support group options try signing up for www.meetup.com.  This website is a social media site where people can form and search for groups based on their interests.  In addition to these resources you can always google your city and “gluten free support group” to find contact information for a group in your area.

Hope these tips make your next GF support group an invaluable and rewarding gluten free experience.
-CC
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